a bunch of stuff I like and make.

my blog

my Society6 spot

machinery:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,
This is important.
Sincerely,
Professor Bootsy

From the "Unbored" website:  Drawing tips from the great GARY PANTER!INTRODUCTION
Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.
You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.
You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.
TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.
2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.
4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.
5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.
7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.
9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.
Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention


Instant reblog always.

machinery:

thenearsightedmonkey:

Dear Students,

This is important.

Sincerely,

Professor Bootsy

From the "Unbored" website:  Drawing tips from the great GARY PANTER!

INTRODUCTION

Get a book-size (or paperback-size)d sketchbook. Write your name and date on an early page and maybe think of a name for it — and if you want, write the book’s name there at the front. Make it into your little painful pal. The pain goes away slowly page by page. Fill it up and do another one. It can be hard to get started. Don’t flunk yourself before you get the ball rolling.

You might want to draw more realistically or in perspective or so it looks slick — that’s is possible and there are tricks and procedures for drawing with more realism if you desire it. But drawing very realistically with great finesse can sometimes produce dead uninteresting drawings — relative, that is, to a drawing with heart and charm and effort but no great finesse.

You can make all kinds of rules for your art making, but for starting in a sketchbook, you need to jump in and get over the intimidation part — by messing up a few pages, ripping them out if need be. Waste all the pages you want by drawing a tic tac toe schematic or something, painting them black, just doodle. Every drawing will make you a little better. Every little attempt is a step in the direction of drawing becoming a part of your life.

TIPS

1. Quickly subdivide a page into a bunch of boxes by drawing a set of generally equidistant vertical lines, then a set of horizontal lines so that you have between 6 and 12 boxes or so on the page. In each box, in turn, in the simplest way possible, name every object you can think of and draw each thing in a box, not repeating. If it is fun, keep doing this on following pages until you get tired or can’t think of more nouns. Now you see that you have some kind of ability to typify the objects in your world and that in some sense you can draw anything.

2. Choose one of the objects that came to mind that you drew and devote one page to drawing that object with your eyes closed, starting at the “nose” of the object (in outline or silhouette might be good) and following the contour you see in your mind’s eye, describing to yourself in minute detail what you know about the object. You can use your free hand to keep track of the edge of the paper and ideally your starting point so that you can work your way back to the designated nose. Don’t worry about proportion or good drawing this is all about memory and moving your hand to find the shapes you are remembering. The drawing will be a mess, but if you take your time, you will see that you know a lot more about the object than you thought.

3. Trace some drawings you like to see better what the artist’s pencil or pen is doing. Tracing helps you observe closer. Copy art you like — it can’t hurt.

4. Most people (even your favorite artists) don’t like their drawings as much as they want to. Why? Because it is easy to imagine something better. This is only ambition, which is not a bad thing — but if you can accept what you are doing, of course you will progress quicker to a more satisfying level and also accidentally make perfectly charming drawings even if they embarrass you.

5. Draw a bunch more boxes and walk down a sidewalk or two documenting where the cracks and gum and splotches and leaves and mowed grass bits are on the square. Do a bunch of those. That is how nature arranges and composes stuff. Remember these ideas — they are in your sketchbook.

6. Sit somewhere and draw fast little drawings of people who are far away enough that you can only see the big simple shapes of their coats and bags and arms and hats and feet. Draw a lot of them. People are alike yet not — reduce them to simple and achievable shapes.

7. To get better with figure drawing, get someone to pose — or use photos — and do slow drawing of hands, feet, elbows, knees, and ankles. Drawing all the bones in a skeleton is also good, because it will help you see how the bones in the arms and legs cross each other and affect the arms’ and legs’ exterior shapes. When you draw a head from the side make sure you indicate enough room behind the ears for the brain case.

8. Do line drawings looking for the big shapes, and tonal drawing observing the light situation of your subject — that is, where the light is coming from and where it makes shapes in shade on the form, and where light reflects back onto the dark areas sometimes.

9. To draw the scene in front of you, choose the middle thing in your drawing and put it in the middle of your page — then add on to the drawing from the center of the page out.

10. Don’t worry about a style. It will creep up on you and eventually you will have to undo it in order to go further. Be like a river and accept everything.

Thanks to our pal, M.A.G. for bringing this to our attention

Instant reblog always.

(via tremorsflyingagain)

(Source: knifeshow, via happydeary)

"Did you go to an art university? Like what did you study? Or are studying :) It's just that I really like to draw but I'm not nearly as good as you, I cannot create good drawings on my own, I can just copy them.. So I would really like to learn how to :)"

— Asked by wizardlysensation

nesskain:

I studied some engineering stuff for 4 years, and went to art school for 6month and I left ‘cause I was dissapointed. This art school was known to give a lot of homeworks and so you had to draw everyday… but it was holidays to me… I was already doing 10 times more at home with my engineering study at the same time… Anyway, it was a good experience I meet a lot of good people, and my art was influence a lot by all the sharing.

I don’t know if there is a good way to learn to draw, so my exercices might work only for me. Try to find your way. Copying things is one way, you can learn from books and so on, from nothing, make some bad choices, that’s what will make your drawing style.

For my part, I’m looking for an honest art style. I was seeking for beautiful art for too long and it was one of my biggest mistake, but as I said bad choice will make your art style too.

I found out that my drawing from observation is my real drawing skill, with a lot of deformation and mistakes.

Drawing from observation and imagination is two differents way of thinking to me.

From observation, the only thing I do is to admit what I see, I don’t do construction, I don’t analyse, I don’t try to understand it. Contrary to what books and teachers say: that you should understand how things works… (but it was too late I already learned some anatomy stuff when I realized what I wanted :D).

From imagination, I start a drawing with a construction (learned from books, tips, my own tips) but I don’t trust my eyes here. With construction everything is not dynamic as my final step depends on theory and something geometrical.

So my quest right now is to be able to draw from imagination like I would do from observation. And I’m still far awayyyyyyy….

Or at least, trying to have my own construction style. But I learned way too much from books/internet to get something of my own. And again and again bad choice will make your drawing style and I don’t regret it.

I only seek for honestly.

Again, it is one way of thinking It might not work for you. Many artists doesn’t draw from observation and have rules or something else and they still do beautiful art.

Thomas Rouzière does art exactly the way I would like to have. I’m still sharing his art, but to me, his drawing from imagination and observation are the same… I’m so so jealous ahah.

http://gommette.tumblr.com/

P.S:  “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" is the most neutral book to start drawing, it just proves that everyone can draw and it doesn’t gives you a way to "make" a drawing style. And when you get all the basic you can start studying things your own way.

sorry for my english,

cheers,

Nesskain

natesketch:

5 Nights at Freddy’s fan art

natesketch:

5 Nights at Freddy’s fan art

babycuts:

thattallsummonerguy:


acid candy pop victorian

We have tons of these kinda houses in my town and the are just really awesome, the houses are actually classified as “Painted Ladies” and the are probably some of the best examples of Asymmetrical, non linear architecture ever created

babycuts:

thattallsummonerguy:

acid candy pop victorian

We have tons of these kinda houses in my town and the are just really awesome, the houses are actually classified as “Painted Ladies” and the are probably some of the best examples of Asymmetrical, non linear architecture ever created

(Source: galacticmimi, via jessicafortnerillustration)

johnisdead:

*stares into the void*
*rolls eyes*

anthonyholden:

Work work workin’ on #LaborDay #WIP #sketch Hope everyone’s having a great day!

anthonyholden:

Work work workin’ on #LaborDay #WIP #sketch Hope everyone’s having a great day!

When trouble strikes, head to the library. You will either be able to solve the problem, or simply have something to read as the world crashes down around you.

— Lemony Snicket (via dailydoseofbookssauce)

(via davidhuyck)

natalie-andrewson:

JUST finished this little print of this little explorer for Out Of Step Arts!!~~

As a Guest Artist the print will only be available in the OOSA shop for a special limited time through September, but it’ll also be at SPX! I’ll have prints at my table (A5), and so will OOSA (W44-45)!! Prints at SPX are discounted a little so get ‘em there if you want!  

Can’t wait to see everyone at SPX this year! I’ll be doing magic wizard commissions again and I’ll probably have a bunch of other dumb drawings with me for sale too :) plus Eris and MAMUANA. **see u thur**~~

misterhayden:

Twitter // Gumroad // Website

(Source: fabien-mense, via victrus)

followandreblog:

angelclark:

99-Year-Old Lady Sews A Dress A Day For Children In Need 

Lillian Weber, a 99-year-old good Samaritan from Iowa, has spent the last few years sewing a dress a day for the Little Dresses For Africa charity, a Christian organization that distributes dresses to children in need in Africa and elsewhere.

Weber’s goal is to make 1,000 dresses by the time she turns 100 on May 6th. So far, she’s made more than 840. Though she says she could make two a day, she only makes one – but each single dress she makes per day is personalized with careful stitchwork. She hopes that each little girl who receives her dress can take pride in her new garment.

If she can do something like this then so should i

(via carisu)